APPETITE FOR SELF-DESTRUCTION STEVE KNOPPER PDF

Few industries inspire more enmity than the record business. Thanks to the Internet and the MP3 revolution, karmic justice has finally been served: The record industry has toppled like a house of cards. To many, its collapse is less a crisis than a beautiful sunset. Digital music was merely the final dagger in its heart. Though the labels persevered, they finally lost control of their product when they chose to ignore the possibilities of the Internet. Musicians can create, produce and distribute their work without the indentured servitude of record labels.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. For the first time, Appetite for Self-Destruction recounts the epic story of the precipitous rise and fall of the recording industry over the past three decades, when the incredible success of the CD turned the music business into one of the most glamorous, high-profile industries in the world—and the advent of file sharing brought it to its knees.

In a comprehensive, fast- For the first time, Appetite for Self-Destruction recounts the epic story of the precipitous rise and fall of the recording industry over the past three decades, when the incredible success of the CD turned the music business into one of the most glamorous, high-profile industries in the world—and the advent of file sharing brought it to its knees.

In a comprehensive, fast-paced account full of larger-than-life personalities, Rolling Stone contributing editor Steve Knopper shows that, after the incredible wealth and excess of the '80s and '90s, Sony, Warner, and the other big players brought about their own downfall through years of denial and bad decisions in the face of dramatic advances in technology.

Big Music has been asleep at the wheel ever since Napster revolutionized the way music was distributed in the s. Now, because powerful people like Doug Morris and Tommy Mottola failed to recognize the incredible potential of file-sharing technology, the labels are in danger of becoming completely obsolete.

Knopper, who has been writing about the industry for more than ten years, has unparalleled access to those intimately involved in the music world's highs and lows. Based on interviews with more than two hundred music industry sources—from Warner Music chairman Edgar Bronfman Jr. From the birth of the compact disc, through the explosion of CD sales in the '80s and '90s, the emergence of Napster, and the secret talks that led to iTunes, to the current collapse of the industry as CD sales plummet, Knopper takes us inside the boardrooms, recording studios, private estates, garage computer labs, company jets, corporate infighting, and secret deals of the big names and behind-the-scenes players who made it all happen.

With unforgettable portraits of the music world's mighty and formerly mighty; detailed accounts of both brilliant and stupid ideas brought to fruition or left on the cutting-room floor; the dish on backroom schemes, negotiations, and brawls; and several previously unreported stories, Appetite for Self-Destruction is a riveting, informative, and highly entertaining read.

It offers a broad perspective on the current state of Big Music, how it got into these dire straits, and where it's going from here—and a cautionary tale for the digital age.

Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Appetite for Self-Destruction , please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Appetite for Self-Destruction. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Jan 09, Sarah rated it really liked it Recommended to Sarah by: Marketplace. Shelves: non-fiction. Oh, the U. You really, really did. Don't be angry because we learned to hate you too well. This was an excellent look at the battle between major music labels and their heels-dug-in resistance to changing technology, opinions, and taste over the past several decades.

With a host of employees as colorful as the artists they represent, it's no wonder life at a major label has resembled a ride on a roller coaster. Seeing the details and history behind the indu Oh, the U.

Seeing the details and history behind the industry's less-than-stellar decisions is fascinating. View 2 comments. Jul 31, Danilo rated it really liked it. Oct 04, Orsolya rated it it was ok Shelves: library , music. Regardless, the clarity of the situation is that things changed with digital. Not just digital in the iTunes realm, but dating back to the advent of CDs.

That is where Appetite for Self-Destruction begins… Appetite for Self-Destruction is divided into time frames depicting how each era in the recording industry led up to or was effected by the digital wave and eminent crash of the industry as we knew it. This sequencing is clear and logical, providing for easy understanding. For example, the explanation of the invention of CDs consists of a chapter which can cause many eyes to droop with technical and engineering jargon.

I had some problems with cohesiveness. Which brings me to my next point: much of the book is a simple re-telling of facts. In fact, Knopper focuses too much on background info versus the topic at hand. The informal language becomes annoying especially as the books follows patterns of having long, informative chunks, then an even longer boring section, and then another entertaining passage, etc.

No consistency was evident. One thing is certainly made clear by Knopper: the recording industry only reacts to its surroundings. Sadly, this is too little, too late. Further, the industry generally runs to one solution: law suits. Sue, sue, sue. Sue everyone! Court, court, court! In time, this rift can only grow unless properly bandaged. Bottom line: The record industry and music industry are two separate animals. There will always be a music industry. Record industry? Not so much.

Feb 04, Blog on Books rated it it was amazing. What appears as a tale of the modern day record era actually dates back even further. Music writer, Steve Knopper begins his treatise, not in the post-digital era as one might imagine from the title, but from the post-Disco era, when the business was awash with money, excesses and a party atmosphere that pre-dates the decades long saviours of MTV and the CD era boom. But from the time computer companies seemingly quietly got an exemption from copy restrictions in their devices CD burners followed several years later by the advent of digital file sharing Napster, Kazaa, etc.

While labels were focused on creating hits through trends boy bands and pop divas being the one Knopper devotes much coverage to as well as relying on the mainstays of independent promotion and a locked down retail structure, college kids were already fleecing the companies through illegal downloads that the labels really never saw coming. Knopper follows the myriad of episodes by which the business was transformed, with both historical reporting as well as interviews with many of the key players, and piuts together a sufficiently detailed timeline of how the business lost its audience and sales clout through this not-so-random chain of events.

Mar 02, Surfing Moose rated it really liked it. Well I've never been a fan of the majors even when my favorite acts ended up on them eventually. This book gave me more insight and answers to questions I had into why they f'd up with the digital evolution. I ended up seeing a similarity between the exec's of the music industry and the greed of Wall Street. That being said, I still love my cds. The art work, the actual physicality of the cd itself, and especially I love albums over singles.

The singles I like are the extended versions a la the Well I've never been a fan of the majors even when my favorite acts ended up on them eventually. The singles I like are the extended versions a la the 80's 12" single. Usually the market dictates price okay I'm not really bought on that one , but iTunes and the record industry decided 99 cents was the going price, not the purchasing public.

This sounds more like price fixing and could be up for an investigation. Me cheap not really. All I'm getting for 99 cents is a digital file, no CD, no case, no artwork. The digital file also includes, my storage and my rented bandwidth. A very good book and an easy read. View 1 comment. Aug 20, Hillery rated it really liked it. Key takeaway from the book: " The music business, however, has a bright future. He personally interviewed many of the senior execs in the music business from the past 30 years and has lots of interesting stories.

The book tackles the period from the post-disco crash in the early '80s through Key takeaway from the book: " The book tackles the period from the post-disco crash in the early '80s through the summer of As with countless other industries, the key narrative boils down to an industry blinded by its success with its current business model and the resulting refusal to see that the world around them had completely changed. By the time they woke up to reality, Knopper points out how they had wasted 8 years fighting the digital revolution.

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Appetite for Self-Destruction: The Spectacular Crash of the Record Industry in the Digital Age

Journalist Knopper MusicHound Swing! You didn't have to be a marketing genius in the s to Lazily written rock journalism masquerading as historical analysis. Knopper is inordinately preoccupied with giving name dropping character studies of record executive excess, and largely devoid of insight into how the industry got left so far behind. He lives in Denver with his wife, Melissa, and daughter Rose.

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For the first time, Appetite for Self-Destruction recounts the epic story of the precipitous rise and fall of the recording industry over the past three decades, when the incredible success of the CD turned the music business into one of the most glamorous, high-profile industries in the world -- and the advent of file sharing brought it to its knees. In a comprehensive, fast-paced account full of larger-than-life personalities, Rolling Stone contributing editor Steve Knopper shows that, after the incredible wealth and excess of the '80s and '90s, Sony, Warner, and the other big players brought about their own downfall through years of denial and bad decisions in the face of dramatic advances in technology. Big Music has been asleep at the wheel ever since Napster revolutionized the way music was distributed in the s. Now, because powerful people like Doug Morris and Tommy Mottola failed to recognize the incredible potential of file-sharing technology, the labels are in danger of becoming completely obsolete.

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