ARTISTS CRAFTSMEN AND TECHNOCRATS PDF

For more than three centuries, emotion has been banished to the wings while cognition has monopolized center stage in the drama of leadership. Since Descartes wrote, "I think, therefore I am," we have been led to believe that the less emotion enters into our judgment, and the more objective and rigorous our thinking processes are, the better our decisions will be. A high IQ has been the path to power. Science and the scientific method have now turned Descartes's assertion on its head: "I am, therefore I think.

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For more than three centuries, emotion has been banished to the wings while cognition has monopolized center stage in the drama of leadership. Since Descartes wrote, "I think, therefore I am," we have been led to believe that the less emotion enters into our judgment, and the more objective and rigorous our thinking processes are, the better our decisions will be.

A high IQ has been the path to power. Science and the scientific method have now turned Descartes's assertion on its head: "I am, therefore I think. What emerges from Damasio's research is a view of humankind quite different from that of cold automatons in pursuit of objectivity. What Damasio reveals is not that emotion is somehow better than thinking, but that thinking is based on emotion. Good judgment and rational thought are vitally dependent on emotional signaling; pain, remorse, guilt, fear, empathy, doubt, and pride help us learn, change, and grow.

Without those emotional signals, our thought processes rigidify. We get stuck in the present, unable to learn from the past or to envisage a better future and strive for it.

What, you might well ask, does all this have to do with leadership? A lot. In the Descartian view, what you need to be a great leader is high IQ: You need to be bright. In the new view that recognizes the value of emotions, leaders have to be bright - and tuned in.

We've learned that intelligence without emotional savvy doesn't get you very far. Let me give you a glimpse inside one global financial services company that ignored the new view. In the mid s, a man in his 40s took over a medium-sized, general-insurance company operating in a regional market. He had a dream - a big dream. His dream was to build a global corporation operating in general and life insurance, banking, trust, and investment services - in short, an integrated financial services empire spanning the world, at a time when insurance was insurance and banking was banking, and never the twain shall meet.

Some people thought he was a nut. What was that company founder like? Anything but a calculating machine. I call him an Artist. Here's how his colleagues described him: warm, generous, people-oriented, imaginative, emotional, unpredictable, open-minded, visionary, inspiring, intuitive, dating, and funny.

How did those qualities contribute to his success? The characteristics warm, generous, funny, and people-oriented, helped him attract and keep great colleagues and investors. The emotional and inspiring traits made his enthusiasm infectious. In being daring, intuitive, unpredictable, and visionary, he created his dream and the winning strategy to make it a reality. Being open to new ideas helped the founder and the corporation evolve, and helped the Artist keep very different kinds of people around him.

That ensured that no single view of the world would prevail in the company. During those years of building, the Artist surrounded himself with talent, and he let that talent find expression in a decentralized power structure.

His key executives ran their own shows. The founder sat on their independent boards and asked questions but didn't interfere. The other executives were a mixed group. There were two other Artists who shared the founder's qualities and character, such as being visionary and funny. Six other executives were described by their peers as well-balanced, trustworthy, reasonable, sensible, and realistic. I call them the Craftsmen. Craftsmen know their business down to their fingertips.

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while. Read preview. In today's challenging times, emotion is at the heart of leadership. Read preview Overview. Miller Fordham University Press, Devine New York University Press, Sapp, Richard W.

American Banker, Vol. We use cookies to deliver a better user experience and to show you ads based on your interests. By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our Privacy Policy.

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Artists, Craftsmen & Technocrats

Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support? Pitcher embarked on an 8 year study of 15 chief executive officers. Her findings and recommendations are insightful and startling. Pitcher paints the portraits of the 3 types of leaders found in organizations: the Artist, the Craftsman and the Technocrat.

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Artists, Craftsmen And Technocrats

By their very nature, designers and makers of wood products know what they want to do and where they want to go with their skills. Unfortunately this determination is often met with roadblocks that our society erects to dissuade the creative spirit. Are these barriers inevitable or are they products of the way we manage our private and public institutions? Such questions are addressed in Artists, Craftsmen and Technocrats, a book that employs the terminology of applied art and design to discuss the state of business management worldwide. Author Patricia Pitcher expands on an eight-year academic study of senior management at an unnamed international corporation and helps us to understand how bad and good management impinges on us all. She concludes that there are three identifiable "styles" of management which she labels artist, craftsman and technocrat. Even those with little interest in the machinations of corporate "politics" will gain something from this book if they ever puzzled over such contradictory jargon as "planning for innovation.

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